Gendered National Bodies & Racial Difference in A Lady’s Ride Across Spanish Honduras

Main Article Content

José I. Lara

Abstract

This article contextualizes Mary Lester’s A Lady’s Ride Across Honduras (1884) within the overall production of travel narratives and the conceptualization of British Empire identity and gender codes during the Victorian period. First of all, it explains how Lester’s narrative provides a “gendered” representation of the Honduran landscape and populations. It also contends that, while Lester’s writing does reveal some details about the culture, local people, and socio-political climate in Honduras, it should be interpreted more so as a written manifestation of British identity, gender roles, and values of the era. This argument is evidenced by explicating how Lester was able to negotiate with discursive structures and pressures associated with femininity and (masculine) colonialism and by illustrating how she textually constructed herself as both an exemplary and superior British female subject through her protagonist Maria Soltera. Overall, this essay attempts to bring to the forefront a piece of literature that is mostly unknown and understudied, but that reflects the undeniable interrelationship between travel literature and discourses of gender and colonialism.

Article Details

How to Cite
Lara, J. (2018). Gendered National Bodies & Racial Difference in A Lady’s Ride Across Spanish Honduras. HUMANITIES BULLETIN, 1(2), 205-222. Retrieved from https://www.journals.lapub.co.uk/index.php/HB/article/view/271
Section
Articles